Large Capacity, multi-use transportation using a cloud based solution

THE BRIEF

This inter-island ferry service has a large crew working across a number of ships. Passengers are a mix of tourists and freight drivers, all requiring differing levels of internet experience on the same network.

THE REIVERNET SOLUTION

The idea was to configure the Reivernet gateway with not 1, but 2 ISP connections. The crew access was routed down the first ISP service, while the freight drivers and tourists were routed down the second ISP connection. This was regardless of where the users were connected within the wireless network.

The crew were given monthly access codes – because the authentication gateway is cloud based, they are active regardless of which boat they are working on.

Because the long-haul freight workers that use the service ships are also on rest time, they have been given monthly access that involves a small connection fee.

Finally, the tourist passengers were sold access codes via the food and beverage outlets on the ship.

THE OUTCOME

By routing the crew traffic and other traffic down separate ISP connections, the Reivernet solution was able to measure the actual experience of the users. That way, the cost structure of providing such access was easily attributed to the business’s relevant cost structure – for example, access for the crew is a cost of service, while the freight and passenger service are revenue centres.

The crew and freight drivers are only required to have one access code per month, but able to connect regardless of what vessel they are sailing. This is the key benefit of the cost-based service.

Hotel in Australia

THE BRIEF

This hotel wished to offer free internet access across the board. However, it was decided to exclude free access for very low-rate guests, as well as for visitors that were in public areas but not using any hotel services.

THE REIVERNET SOLUTION

Because the Reivernet gateway interfaces to any hotel PMS, it was easy for the hotel to flag the people to whom they did not want to offer ‘packaged’ internet.

In the large public areas that include food and beverage outlets, the hotel decided to offer 30-minutes free access at a capped speed of 256kbps to all visitors. If visitors (not in-house guests) wish to continue using the service, they are presented a credit card portal page.

When dining in a food and beverage outlet, service staff are asked to look out for guests that are using computing devices. They then inform them that, if they wish to have more time, or a faster service, they can be provided with an easy-to-generate access code. (This code would give the user a minimum connection speed of 512kbps.)

THE OUTCOME

The hotel now offers packaged internet to over 80% of their guests, while low rate guests or visitors are charged for internet (this included the time when the hotel was full with an international delegation in town for a one-off conference).

The 20% of paying guests generated enough revenue to pay for the bandwidth and the Reivernet solution. Because the payable service is targeted, the hotel staff are now able to explain to the guests why they are being charged.

High school in New Zealand

THE BRIEF

Today, students bring their own computing devices to use for educational purposes. Therefore, schools need to provide internet access. The problem for this school was that they didn’t have any control of the amount of bandwidth that was being transferred, and they had no idea about how the students were using it.

To add to the problem, teachers often found access was agonisingly slow. However, the school could not identify why.

THE REIVERNET SOLUTION

First, the Reivernet software was able to identify and segment the school body into junior students, senior students, teaching and support staff and school visitors. This enabled the school to ‘see’ the actual speed being experienced by each segment in real time. It also identified and reported on the heavy and low users.

With this information at hand, the school set a ‘fair use’ policy. The Reivernet software was configured to automatically manage active users who exceeded the policy limits.

THE OUTCOME

The school’s internet access is driven from the active directory, ensuring that only students or teaching staff have access. Now, if a visitor wants to use the internet, the Reivernet gateway presents a credit card portal page. This not only maximises the bandwidth for students, teachers and staff, but also generates additional revenue for the school.

After hours, the school is often rented for parties and meetings. If internet access is required, then the attendees can easily connect without needing to speak to on-site school staff.

Finally, the school student access was restricted to Monday to Friday between the hours of 7am and 7pm, thus ensuring the school staff has after-hours internet access.

650 room hotel in Middle East

THE BRIEF

This hotel had a mix of long-term residents and short-term hotel guests. It continued to buy more and more bandwidth, yet there were still guest complaints about broadband speed (even once they had 100Mbps).

The hotel had a service, prior to Reivernet where the switch ports were configured to ensure no user could transfer data faster than 3Mbps in the guest rooms and no faster than 256kbps in public areas. The supplier recognised that the hotel network was busy, but couldn’t identify where it was being stretched.

THE REIVERNET SOLUTION

The hotel turned to Reivernet. Our software was initially deployed to the same configuration of the existing gateway – however, using the software and not the hardware to control the speeds.

Using our real-time reporting capabilities, we were able to identify the key issue: less than 10 long-stay guests were responsible for most of the network congestion.

The solution was obvious. Using our advanced software, the 100Mbps of speed was divided into bandwidth ‘pools’ from 5Mbps to 35Mbps (long term residence). As guests connected, our software automatically allocated them into the appropriate bandwidth pool.

Instead of providing a capped speed of 3Mbps in the rooms and 256Kbps in public areas, every guest was assigned into a bandwidth pool. Then, our ‘pools’ were ‘alarmed’ with minimum speed alarms. In the apartments (where the maximum speed has been 3Mbps) the average guest was now receiving an enhanced experience, often in the 20Mbps range.

As the Reivernet software is automated by the hotel PMS, no staff time was required to support the service. Guest complaints dropped significantly as the speeds were consistently excellent, and the hotel management were able to report on their heavy users and were able to decide what specific controls to place on them. If a long-term apartment guest wished to use the internet in the public areas, our smart software tracked their in-room profile, following them throughout the hotel. This meant that they were not restricted to the configuration in the public area.

Finally, our bandwidth reporting shows that the hotel does not need 100Mbps of bandwidth. On average, the network would provide the same average guest experience with 50Mbps, allowing the hotel to save on its bandwidth costs.

THE OUTCOME

The hotel now offers packaged internet to over 80% of their guests, while low rate guests or visitors are charged for internet (this included the time when the hotel was full with an international delegation in town for a one-off conference).

In today’s device-intense networks, effective and automated management of visitor networks is critical in improving guest satisfaction. This can be achieved by making fact-based decisions and buying the appropriate amount of bandwidth.